FP7 post-grant Open Access publishing funds pilot

With Open Access publishing on the rise, new business models emerge.  Some journals choose to charge the author a fee to cover publishing costs. Although not all Open Access Journals ask an Article Processing Charge (APC), researchers may have to pay for the publication of their article. Because articles are often published after the research project is finished, this cost is generally not covered by funding. Continue reading “FP7 post-grant Open Access publishing funds pilot”

Publishers, where is the added value?

Sauropod Vertebra Picture of the Week

It’s nearly two years since Alexander Brown wrote Open access: why academic publishers still add value for the Guardian, in which he listed ways that he feels publishers make a contribution. I wrote a lengthy comment in response — long enough that it got truncated at 5000 characters and I had to post a second comment with the tail end. At the time, I intended to turn that comment into an SV-POW! post, but for some reason I never did. Belatedly, here it is.

I’m a bit nonplussed by this article, in which a publisher lists a lot of important services that they claim to provide, nearly all of which turn out to be either not important at all (if not actively harmful) or provided for free by academics. Let’s go through them one by one, and see how they measure up against the average cost to academia of $5333 per…

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Open Access Publishing

Open Access Publishing

In another post, we’ve shown that it is perfectly possible to make your work Open Access even if you’re not publishing in Open Access Journals. This post wants to give an overview of recent trends and challenges in Open Access Publishing. (‘for dummies’: I am sure that a lot of information can be added. Please leave your remarks in the comment section below!) Continue reading “Open Access Publishing”